September 20, 2021

Weekly review: Will Biden's vaccine requirements survive in court? Here's what legal experts think.

Daily Briefing

    How to fight the 'nursing exodus,' what the next six months of the pandemic will bring, and more.

    Will Biden's vaccine requirements survive in court? Here's what legal experts think. (Monday, Sept. 13)

    President Joe Biden last week announced new rules requiring most federal workers, health care workers, and some private sector employees to get vaccinated against Covid-19. Here's how politicians, businesses, and health experts are responding—and how legal experts predict the rules will fare in court.

    How to fight the 'nursing exodus.' (Hint: It isn't $40,000 sign-on bonuses) (Tuesday, Sept. 14)

    Many health systems are battling an exodus of nurses as Covid-19 cases surge—and they're turning to eye-popping signing bonuses to try to meet their staffing needs. But according to Advisory Board's Carol Boston-Fleischhauer, these "unsustainable" solutions are entirely the wrong approach.

    What will the pandemic's next 6 months bring? Here's what top experts predict. (Wednesday, Sept. 15)

    The delta variant's spread is forcing experts to revise how they believe the pandemic will continue to play out. Here's what leading experts think the next six months will look like—and how the pandemic will eventually come to an end, Michelle Fay Cortez reports for Bloomberg.

    How well do booster shots work? Here's what new data from Israel reveals. (Thursday, Sept. 16)

    Emerging data from Israel suggests that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine's protection against severe Covid-19 and hospitalization wanes over time, but that booster shots dramatically reduced both infections and serious illnesses.

    Legitimate or 'loophole': Who decides if a religious objection to vaccination is sincere? (Friday, Sept. 17)

    As more workers around the country are required to be vaccinated against Covid-19, thousands are seeking religious exemptions to the mandates—sometimes forcing employers to determine whether an individual is inappropriately seeking a "loophole" to avoid vaccination.

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.