June 7, 2021

Around the nation: Kentucky AG sues CVS Health over state's opioid crisis

Daily Briefing

    Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against CVS Health, alleging the pharmacy chain played a role in "fueling the [opioid] crisis" by sending millions of doses of prescription painkillers to the state, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Florida, Kentucky, and Texas.

    • Florida: Baptist Health has named Michael Mayo as president and CEO. Mayo was named interim president and CEO of Baptist Health earlier this year after the health system's former president and CEO, Brett McClung, resigned. Mayo has previously served as president of Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville and as CEO of Orange Park Medical Center and Frankfort Regional Medical Center (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 6/2).
    • Kentucky: Attorney General Daniel Cameron on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against CVS Health, alleging the pharmacy chain played a role in "fueling the [opioid] crisis" by sending millions of doses of prescription painkillers to the state. "As both distributor and pharmacy, CVS was in a unique position to monitor and stop the peddling of these highly-addictive drugs from their stores, yet they ignored their own safeguard systems," Cameron said in a release. Cameron added that "[d]espite supplying staggering quantities of opioids in Kentucky, CVS reported zero suspicious orders for its Kentucky stores." In a statement, CVS said pharmacists do not write prescriptions or determine medical treatment for a patient. "That is the role of physicians, who have the responsibility to write appropriate prescriptions." CVS added that opioids "are made and marketed by drug manufacturers, not pharmacies" (Schreiner, Associated Press, 6/2; Siemaszko, NBC News, 6/2; Sonka, Louisville Courier Journal, 6/2).
    • Texas: Medical Center Hospital has lifted many of its mask requirements, generally not requiring hospital visitors to wear masks unless they are in a room with a patient, although the hospital will continue to encourage the practice. Similarly, staff are required to wear masks when they enter a room and in certain other patient-facing situations, but not all staff will be required to always wear masks, Christin Timmons, CNO at the hospital, said. "We have removed masks. We are highly encouraging masks to be worn, but we are not going to catch someone in our hallways and ask them to leave because they're not wearing a mask," Timmons said (Haefner, Becker's Hospital Review, 6/2; NewsWest9, 6/1).
    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.