April 8, 2021

Map: The states with the highest (and lowest) salaries for RNs

Daily Briefing

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) last week released data on how much RNs are paid in each state as part of its latest occupational employment statistics survey.

    Cheat sheets: Best places to work

    About the BLS report

    According to BLS, the data includes clinical nurse specialists but excludes nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners.

    The survey attempted to reflect employment and salaries as of May 2020. According to BLS, however, the Covid-19 epidemic may have skewed the statistics for several reasons, including that the report incorporates data from survey panels conducted before Covid-19 emerged and that the epidemic led to lower-than-usual survey response rates.

    The states with the highest average annual wage for RNs

    In its report, BLS found the average annual wage for RNs was $80,101 as of May 2020, while the average hourly wage was $38.47.

    BLS found the five states with the highest average annual wage for RNs were:

    1. California ($120,560);
    2. Hawaii ($104,830);
    3. Massachusetts ($96,250);
    4. Oregon ($96,230); and
    5. Alaska ($95,270).

    Meanwhile, BLS found the five states with the lowest annual wage for RNs were:

    1. Alabama ($60,230);
    2. South Dakota ($60,960);
    3. Mississippi ($61,250);
    4. Iowa ($62,570); and
    5. Arkansas ($63,640).

    (Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey, accessed 4/6; Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/2; Bureau of Labor Statistics press release).

    Cheat sheets: Best places to work

    Get 1-page cheat sheets on how "Best Places to Work" organizations are chosen

    Is your organization recognized as a "Best Place to Work?" If not, you could be missing an important tool to recruit new employees—and a big opportunity to spotlight your employee engagement work with current staff. Download our cheat sheets to learn exactly how influential publications decide who makes the cut (and who doesn't):

    Download Now

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.