Daily Briefing

Weekend reads: 9 ways to debunk false claims made by friends and family, according to experts


Why politics are becoming tougher to avoid at work, why we do things we know we'll regret, and more.

Lex Ashcroft's reads

9 ways to debunk false claims made by friends and family. Sharing opinions and beliefs is commonplace at familiar gatherings. But what happens when someone shares misinformation? Even when a source of information is known to be questionable, research shows many people will still believe a claim if it's repeated enough. Writing for the Washington Post, Teddy Amenabar breaks down the advice given by experts on how to handle misinformation from friends and family: focus on shared experiences, ask simple questions, don't overwhelm with information, and more.

Why we do things we know we'll regret. At some point on our lives, we have all done something we knew would not benefit us. Consequently, many of our natural impulses ultimately lead to unhappiness, so why do we keep making these choices? Writing for The Atlantic, Arthur Brooks explains how the survival instincts our ancestors relied on have influenced the way we now relate to things, as well as other people. Using the practical lesson of using resources joyfully, Brooks details how we can invite more joy and less regret into our lives.

Allie Rudin's reads

Body positivity icons? Meet the contenders of this year's 'Fat Bear Week.' It's back, and it's (if you'll pardon the pun) bigger than ever. Now in its ninth year, "Fat Bear Week" was started by a former Katmai National Park ranger who "fell in love with" the Alaskan park's thriving population of brown bears. Writing for the New York Times, Remy Tumin breaks down the 12 chunky contenders for this year's contest and explores the special ecosystem they call home. The 2022 winner will be crowned on Oct. 11 after a week of online bracket-style competition.

Politics are becoming tougher to avoid at work. Your workplace is apparently not immune to the trend of growing political polarization and tension, according to a new survey from the Society for Human Resource Management. And another recent study from the National Bureau of Economic Research indicates that the boardroom especially is becoming more partisan and right-leaning. Taylor Telford explores what research tells us about politics in the workplace for the Washington Post—and what experts say organization leaders should be thinking about as we approach Election Day.

 


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