March 22, 2021

Around the nation: Missouri to expand Covid-19 vaccine eligibility to all adults on April 19

Daily Briefing

    Gov. Mike Parson (R) on Thursday announced that all adults in Missouri will be eligible to receive Covid-19 vaccines beginning April 19, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, Illinois, and Missouri.

    • District of Columbia: HHS on Thursday announced that it will propose new rules for the Title X federal family planning program to undo the changes made to the program under former President Donald Trump's administration. HHS said it "plans to propose revised regulations" that would make the program "substantively similar" to the way it was from 2000 to until 2019, when HHS under the Trump administration issued a final rule that bars entities that receive Title X family planning grants from providing or referring patients for abortion care. HHS said it intends to have a new rule proposed by April 15 and finalized by fall 2021 (Weixel, The Hill, 3/18; Ollstein, Politico, 3/18).
    • Illinois: Hospital Sisters Health System has named Damond Boatwright as president and CEO, effective in June. Boatwright currently serves as regional president of SSM Health's Wisconsin region and previously held a variety of leadership roles at HCA Healthcare. Boatwright will succeed Mary Starmann-Harrison, who is retiring in July (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 3/18).
    • Missouri: Gov. Mike Parson (R) on Thursday announced the state is expanding its Covid-19 vaccine eligibility to all its adult residents on April 19. Before the state's vaccine eligibility broadens to all adults, Parson said people experiencing homelessness, racial and ethnic minorities, restaurant workers, and other vulnerable communities will become eligible to receive the vaccines on March 29. Parson said he expects the state's vaccine supply will increase in the coming weeks, and his administration wants to ensure all its residents who are interested in the vaccine are eligible for the shots. "Supply projections are subject to change, but it is critical that we start preparing for this potential influx and ensure there is a consistent number of people who are eligible and interested in receiving a vaccine," Parson said (Ballentine, Associated Press, 3/18).

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