September 17, 2021

Around the nation: Broadway's top musicals reopen after 18-month shutdown

Daily Briefing

    Some of the top Broadway musicals have reopened after being shut down for 18 months during the pandemic, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California, Georgia, and New York.

    • California: Los Angeles County officials on Wednesday announced people will be required to show proof of Covid-19 vaccination to enter indoor drinking establishments, such as bars, nightclubs, breweries, and wineries, beginning next month, Axios reports. According to a statement from the county's Department of Public Health, customers and employees of affected venues will have to show proof of at least one vaccine dose beginning Oct. 7 and two vaccine doses by Nov. 4. In addition, county officials said that while proof of vaccination is not required to enter restaurants, it is encouraged. "This is a reasonable path forward that can position us to be better able to break the cycle of surges," Barbara Ferrer, director of the county health department, said. (Falconer, Axios, 9/16)
    • Georgia: Delta Air Lines on Monday said its new policy to penalize unvaccinated workers with a $200 health insurance surcharge has led nearly 20% of its 20,000 unvaccinated workers to get vaccinated against Covid-19, Business Insider reports. According to Henry Ting, Delta's chief health officer, 78% of the company's 80,000 employees are vaccinated, up from roughly 74% when the new policy was announced on Aug. 30. This increase is "a huge number in terms of shifting that group that's most reluctant," Ting said. In addition, Ting said the company has not seen any employee turnover or resignations due to the new policy. (Jackson, Business Insider, 9/13)
    • New York: Several of Broadway's biggest shows reopened on Tuesday night after the pandemic forced shows to close for 18 months—the longest shutdown in Broadway's history, the New York Times reports. The musicals, including "Wicked," "The Lion King," and "Hamilton," are some of the biggest shows in musical theater and drew in packed crowds for their performances. "Broadway, and all of the arts and culture of the city, express the life, the energy, the diversity, the spirit of New York City," Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) said. "It's in our heart and soul. It's also so much of what people do to make a living in this town. And that makes us great. So, this is a big night for New York City's comeback." Patrons attending shows on Broadway must show proof of vaccination or a negative coronavirus test if under the age of 12 and wear a mask while inside the theaters. (Paulson, New York Times, 9/14; Gonzalez, Axios, 9/15)

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