August 27, 2021

Weekend reads: Could mosquitos become blind to humans?

Daily Briefing

    The potentially Herculean task of deflecting a catastrophic asteroid, what this summer has been like for flight attendants, and more.

    Ben Palmer's reads

    Could mosquitos become blind to humans? Mosquitos are a major annoyance every spring and summer, but what if you had the ability to become entirely invisible to them? Writing for the New York Times, Sabrina Imbler dives into a paper published in Current Biology in which scientists utilized the CRISPR gene-editing tool to create a type of mosquito entirely blind to human beings.

    What this summer has been like for flight attendants. It's been a stressful time for everyone in the United States, but this summer has been especially stressful for flight attendants, between bad weather, frequent delays, and unruly passengers. Writing for the New York Times, Tacey Rychter recounts what this summer has been like for flight attendants, with one attendant saying some passengers make it so she doesn't "even feel like a human anymore."

    Vivian Le's reads

    Elizabeth Holmes prepares to speak out. After Theranos, a supposedly groundbreaking blood testing company, imploded in 2016, its beleaguered founder, Elizabeth Holmes has tried to tell her side of story, even going so far as to try and solicit a book deal. While the book deal never materialized, Holmes' upcoming criminal fraud trial may be her chance to speak up. Writing for the Wall Street Journal, Christopher Weaver and Sara Randazzo explore the troubles Holmes has faced since Theranos folded and what might happen at her upcoming trial.

    The potentially Herculean task of deflecting a catastrophic asteroid. For more than 20 years, a team of researchers have used a specially designed gun to fire at meteorites—all in preparation for if, or when, a potentially disastrous asteroid targets Earth. However, since destroying such a rock is likely too lofty a goal, researchers have turned their attention to something simpler: deflecting the rock off its course. Writing for the New York Times, Katherine Kornei explains how scientists are testing "kinetic impact deflection" and how it might prepare us for future impacts.

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