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April 22, 2022

Around the nation: DOJ charges 21 people nationwide with $150M in Covid-related health care fraud

Daily Briefing

    The Department of Justice charged 21 people over the past nine days in a nationwide push to prosecute individuals who exploited the pandemic through Covid-related fraud schemes, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, Iowa, and Maryland.

    • District of Columbia: The Department of Justice (DOJ) on Wednesday announced it charged 21 people over the past nine days in a nationwide push to prosecute individuals who exploited the pandemic through Covid-related fraud schemes. In total, the cases amounted to around $150 million in alleged fraudulent billings and theft from federal Covid-19 assistance programs, and more than $8 million in cash and other fraud proceeds. "Today's enforcement action sends a very clear message that we will stop at nothing to root out COVID-19 related healthcare fraud, wherever it may be found," said Assistant Attorney General Kenneth Polite. "The Department of Justice is committed to protecting the American people and the critical healthcare benefits programs that assist them during this national emergency. And most importantly, we will hold those who exploit those programs accountable to the fullest extent of the law." (AP/Modern Healthcare, 4/20)
    • Iowa: St. Anthony Regional Hospital on Wednesday named Allen Anderson as its new president and CEO, effective July 1. He succeeds Ed Smith, who has served as the hospital's CEO since 2012. Anderson previously served as Avera Tyler Hospital's CEO and administrator and VP of support services and operations at Granite Falls Municipal Hospital and Manor. (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/20)
    • Maryland: CalvertHealth on Monday announced that Dean Teague plans to retire as president and CEO in 2023. Teague, who joined CalvertHealth as COO in 2012 and stepped into his current role in 2015, plans to lead the health system until his successor takes over. "The pandemic put things in perspective for me, and now it's time for me to step back and enjoy retirement," Teague said. During his tenure, Teague was credited with playing an instrumental part in constructing new private rooms, growing behavioral health services, and rebranding the health system. (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/20)

     

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