January 7, 2022

Weekend reads: Is art the path to happiness?

Daily Briefing

    How exercising with other people benefits your brain, why some libraries are hiring social workers, and more.

    Vivian Le's reads

    Why some libraries are hiring social workers. Libraries are more than just places for books—they often act as community centers and help people's various social and economic needs. Writing for NPR's "Shots," Darian Benson explains how social workers at some libraries help community members with a bevy of important concerns, including how to access health care and where to find housing.

    Is art the path to happiness? While making art has long been considered a form of self-expressive therapy, some experts now believe that even passive participation with art—looking at it, admiring it, etc.—could provide people mental health benefits. Writing for the Wall Street Journal, Christina Cacouris describes more hospitals are incorporating art and beauty into their treatments, including prescribing visits to art museums and transforming their psychiatric wards into art galleries.

    Alyssa Nystrom's reads

    How exercising with other people benefits your brain. In 2020, the world collectively spent over $7 billion on supplements that claimed to enhance brain health—but according to a new book based on hundreds of studies, there may only be one legitimate way to enhance your brain health. Writing for Vox, Emily Willingham explains how the combination of physical activity and social interaction can help improve your brain health.

    Home remedies can help treat certain conditions. Millions of Americans rely on home remedies—also known as "complementary" or "alternative" medicines—instead of doctor visits and conventional drugs. Writing for the Washington Post, Marlene Cimons explains the science behind several popular home remedies. 

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