Daily Briefing

Weekend reads: The surprising effectiveness of 'super short workouts'


How researching white brain matter can lead to more effective treatments for brain conditions, why fashion brands are putting sustainability "at the heart of their strategic plans," and more. 

Vivian Le's reads

The case for white matter research. While many people are aware of the importance of the brain's gray matter, or areas of neurons in the brain associated with learning and memory, the other half of the brain, white matter, is usually overlooked. Writing for The Conversation, Christopher Filley, a professor of neurology and psychiatry at the University of Colorado, explains why understanding white matter, which connects the neurons within gray matter, can help lead to new, potentially more effective treatments for brain conditions, including Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injuries.

The surprising impact of super short workouts. The claim that a just a few minutes of exercise could help you become fitter and healthier seems too good to be true, but there is a growing body of research that suggests even short workouts can lead to meaning results. Writing for the Washington Post, Christie Aschwanden explains how short, but high-intensity cardio exercises and brief strength training regimes can improve health and build muscle just as, or more, effectively than longer, more moderate exercises.

Alyssa Nystrom's reads

How to combat burnout without (totally) disrupting your life.  A September 2021 survey from consulting firm Korn Ferry found that around 89% of professionals were suffering from burnout—a struggle that led some to quit their jobs, move to another city, or make other "similarly drastic changes." Writing for the Wall Street Journal, Ray Smith offers five suggestions to help those suffering "address their burnout and not shake up their lives too much."

Can fashion really be sustainable? In 2018, the United Nations debuted the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate action, with specific science-based sustainability goals for the fashion industry, including net-zero carbon emissions by 2050—and many fashion brands now claim to place sustainability "at the heart of their strategic plans." Writing for the New York Times, Vanessa Friedman explains why the term "sustainable fashion" can feel like a contradiction.


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