April 15, 2020

Around the nation: Children's hospitals ask SCOTUS to strike down Medicaid DSH payment cuts

Daily Briefing

    The hospitals say the rule "wipes out vital supplemental payments to children's hospitals and other safety-net hospitals" and "severely harms children's hospitals' ability to provide vital care to the most vulnerable," in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, Georgia, and Virginia.

    • District of Columbia: A group of children's hospitals has petitioned the Supreme Court to review and strike down a 2017 federal rule that reduced Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital payments. Last year, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit upheld the rule, which CMS claims prevents hospitals from receiving "double pay for costs that have already been compensated" by private insurers or Medicare. However, the hospitals say the rule "wipes out vital supplemental payments to children's hospitals and other safety-net hospitals" and "severely harms children's hospitals' ability to provide vital care to the most vulnerable." (Romoser, Inside Health Policy, 4/13 [subscription required]).

    • Georgia: Walmart has announced plans to open two new freestanding health centers in Georgia. Currently, Walmart operates a standalone health center in Dallas, Georgia, and Calhoun, Georgia. The company plans to be open its new centers in the state this summer, in Loganville and Newnan (Ellison, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/10).

    • Virginia: Gov. Ralph Northam (D) on Friday signed into law a series of bills that scaled back restrictions on abortion care in Virginia. The new laws remove regulations that had required patients to receive an ultrasound at least 24 hours prior to receiving an abortion and that patients receive counseling on abortion alternatives. The new laws also remove a previous requirement that abortion facilities that provided more than five abortions annually had to receive hospital designation (Kelly, CNN, 4/10).

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.