March 10, 2020

Around the nation: Tennessee hospital will not charge patients affected by tornado out-of-pocket costs

Daily Briefing

    Melahn Finley, a spokesperson for Cookeville Regional Medical Center, said the hospital treated patients with injuries resulting from the tornado last week and will bill their insurers, but will not charge patients additional charges beyond what their insurer covers, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California and Tennessee.

    • California: Uber and Lyft recently announced plans to expand services to help tackle the social determinants of health. Lyft on Thursday said the company is teaming up with United Us, a social coordination platform, to connect health care systems with social service providers. Meanwhile, Uber last week announced it is releasing a number of features aimed at helping patients, including one that would allow health care providers to message drivers directly to make pickups easier for patient, a so-called "landline-scheduling" feature, a multilingual notification feature, and designated pick-up locations to help drivers find patients in large locations, such as hospitals (Japsen, Forbes, 3/5).

    • California: The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors on Friday held a special meeting with city, county, and state leaders to figure out how to keep Daly City's only hospital, Seton Medical Center, open. The hospital is at risk of closing after its nonprofit owner declared bankruptcy and recent discussions with a potential buyer stalled. During Friday's meeting, the board discussed possibly purchasing the hospital or helping the hospital secure another buyer (NBC Bay Staff, KNTV, 3/6).

    • Tennessee: Cookeville Regional Medical Center will not charge patients affected by last week's tornado any out-of-pocket medical fees. Melahn Finley, a spokesperson for Cookeville Regional Medical Center, said the hospital treated patients with injuries resulting from the tornado last week and will bill their insurers, but will not charge patients additional charges beyond what their insurer covers. Finley said, "We will not bill patients for the remaining portion after insurance. If they don't have insurance, they will not be charged" (Pereira, ABC News, 3/8).

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