Telehealth: Scaling Remote Patient Monitoring Programs

Effectively Expand Services Across Clinical Programs

Read this brief to learn 10 tactics that detail how to efficiently and effectively scale remote patient monitoring programs that address the needs of diverse patient populations.

Remote patient monitoring technologies increase patient access, improve outcomes, and reduce costs for patients with chronic conditions.

Learn 10 tactics for scaling remote patient monitoring programs that address the needs of diverse patient populations.

Remote patient monitoring technologies increase patient access, improve outcomes, and reduce costs for patients with chronic conditions. As grant-funded pilot programs continue to demonstrate these benefits, organizations are expanding from pilot programs that monitor patients with specific conditions, such as congestive heart failure to programs that monitor a variety of conditions and complex patients.

However, organizations scaling remote monitoring services across clinical programs and care sites often find themselves duplicating time- and resource-intensive investment processes with each expansion step. Many programs are less effective or less efficient than expected, limiting opportunities to demonstrate ROI to secure additional investment. 

Centura Pilot Program Shows Dramatic Readmission Reduction

The following 10 tactics detail how to efficiently and effectively scale remote patient monitoring programs that address the needs of diverse patient populations.

Ten Tactics to Scale Remote Patient Monitoring Programs

1. Centralize monitoring program decision making

Embedding program investment decisions in one leader or body simplifies the monitoring and telehealth investment process.

2. Avoid redundancy in program staffing

A dedicated monitoring program staff, rather than staff dedicated to one condition, meets patient monitoring needs regardless of condition.

3. Design standardized assessment to examine patient risk

Universal patient psychosocial and health assessments solidify organizational criteria for identifying patients at risk of readmission.

4. Cross-reference existing data to prioritize patient monitoring need

Existing in-house patient data can be weighed against risk criteria to determine which patients need monitoring.

5. Include monitoring as part of post-discharge care plan

Integrating monitoring into patient care plans early boosts engagement and physician participation.

6. Use education to engage physicians

Proactive education makes physicians more likely to participate in monitoring efforts by allaying their concerns about the time burden of monitoring.

7. Utilize non-clinical care team members to coordinate and address patient needs

Care coordinators act as liaisons between patients and providers to meet patient clinical and psychosocial needs that may otherwise keep them from managing their conditions.

8. Train care coordinators to transition patients to self-management

Coordinators can educate and motivate patients about improving and managing their condition to minimize need for extended patient monitoring.

9. Use pilot program data to highlight monitoring’s contribution to cost savings

Presenting cost avoidance data presents a compelling case for monitoring investment.

10. Make the case for monitoring by focusing on added efficiency

Monitoring technology collects accurate data to ensure capture of all opportunities to adjust patient care plans and captures patient data more quickly than telephonic management to free up care management team time.

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