The Workplace

Insights for building a high performance workforce

The 3 mistakes you're making in performance reviews—and how to fix them

August 17, 2018

Editor's note: This popular story from the Daily Briefing's archives was republished on Jan. 4, 2019.

By Jackie Kimmell, Senior Analyst

Part five in a series of the seven conversations all managers should be having with their employees

Let's face it: Performance reviews are nerve-wracking—and not just for the employees receiving the review. For managers, preparing reviews often takes up days or even weeks of work time, and delivering the sometimes-difficult feedback to employees can feel emotionally daunting.

Even so, performance reviews are critical. When done right, they're a powerful tool for improving employee engagement and motivating better performance.

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Your employees need regular recognition to stay engaged. Here are 3 ways to make it a habit.

August 3, 2018

By Jackie Kimmell, Senior Analyst

Part four in a series of the seven conversations all managers should be having with their employees

Regular recognition is a key component of employee engagement, but many managers struggle with knowing how to best recognize their employees or how to make this recognition a regular habit.

A recent study published in the Harvard Business Review found that 82% of employed Americans don't feel like their supervisors recognize them enough for their contributions. And this hurts productivity—40% of them say they'd put more energy into their work if they were recognized more often.

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The 3 reasons your new hires keep leaving—and how to retain them

July 27, 2018

Part three in a series of the seven conversations all managers should have with their employees

By Jackie Kimmell, Senior Analyst 

You've finally done it: You've hired the perfect person for a job. You conducted a thorough, evidence-backed behavioral interview to find the right candidate. You welcomed your new hire to the fold with a first-week check-in. And then, six months later, your dream candidate hands in their resignation letter.

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Have a new hire? This is the first meeting you should schedule.

July 19, 2018

Editor's note: This popular story from the Daily Briefing's archives was republished on Jan. 16, 2020.

By Jackie Kimmell, Senior Analyst

Part two of our series on the seven conversations all managers should have with their employees

We all know that first impressions matter—but you may not know that that rule applies to both personal and professional first impressions. Research shows a new hire's first impression of their manager, and the organization, can have a lasting impact on their engagement, productivity, and length of time spent at the job.

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You're hiring the wrong employees. Here's how to find the right ones.

July 12, 2018

By Jackie Kimmell, Senior Analyst

Part one in a series on the seven conversations you should be having with your employees

You know the statistics: Staff turnover at the typical hospital is high—a rate of about 13.7% in 2017. Each employee who leaves costs an average of 1.5 times the employee's annual salary to be replaced. For the typical hospital, then, turnover is literally a multi-million-dollar problem.

“Too often, staffers quit simply because they were never the right fit for the job in the first place.”

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How to spot your 'fatal flaw' as a leader—before it's too late

July 6, 2018

Our take: Learn the four ways your organization can support leaders in identifying their "fatal flaws"

Executives typically know their greatest strengths, but they may not be so savvy when it comes to identifying their greatest weaknesses, Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman write for the Harvard Business Review.

Leaders don't know their weaknesses

"Everyone has weaknesses," Zenger and Folkman—CEO and president, respectively, of Zenger/Folkman, a leadership development consultancy—write, and "mild" ones typically don't "impact a person's overall effectiveness." Their research has found that leaders who score in the bottom 10% on a key skill will be ranked in the bottom-fifth overall, regardless of their strengths. "Bottom line, leaders don't need to be extremely good at everything," Zenger and Folkman write, "but they generally cannot be totally void in one area and still succeed."

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3 'microshifts' to engage your staff—without adding work to your plate

June 29, 2018

Editor's note: This popular story from the Daily Briefing's archives was republished on Oct. 29, 2019.

By Craig Pirner, Managing Director, Talent Development

You know the statistics: Engaged employees are more likely to be high performers and to stick around at an organization than their less-engaged peers.

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How to say 'no'—without losing your team

May 15, 2018

By Craig Pirner, Managing Director

As a leader you've likely faced many requests you simply can't deliver on: "I don't want to work on Fridays or weekends"; "I'd like a raise"; "I've been in this role for two months and I'm ready to advance to the next level."

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