March 22, 2021

Weekly review: Why Fauci is warning of another potential coronavirus surge

Daily Briefing

    Why "covert vaccinees" are keeping their vaccine status a secret, whether blue light glasses really work, and more.

    Why Fauci is warning of another potential coronavirus surge (Monday, March 15)

    Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, last week said Europe's recent surge in cases of the novel coronavirus should serve as a warning for the United States.

    Why 'covert vaccinees' are keeping their vaccine status a secret (Tuesday, March 16)

    Writing for The Atlantic, Katherine Wu profiles 12 people who have received the Covid-19 vaccine but opted to keep their newly vaccinated status a secret—revealing "a harrowing form of eligibility warfare" that could contribute to people's reluctance to get vaccinated at all.

    'Like I wasn't there': What it's like to survive 'locked-in syndrome' (Wednesday, March 17)

    Jake Haendel suffered for months from "locked-in syndrome," a rare phenomenon in which a patient is unable to move or communicate but remains fully conscious. But unlike most locked-in patients, Haendel recovered—and now he's sharing his experience, Josh Wilbur writes for The Guardian.

    Blue light glasses are booming—but do they really work? (Thursday, March 18)

    As more people spend their entire work day in front of a computer, sales of blue light glasses—which incorporate special lenses that filter out certain light waves emitted by digital devices—have boomed. But do these glasses actually reduce eye strain or improve sleep?

    Map: The states with the highest (and lowest) vaccine completion rates (Friday, March 19)

    New CDC research indicates that the vast majority of Americans who have received their first Covid-19 vaccine shot returned to receive their second shot—but there were some significant caveats. Find out how your state is faring on our interactive map.

    The Covid-19 resources you need right now

    covid vaccine

    We've updated our Covid-19 resource page to make it easier to find our top research and recommendations. Find the resources you need—when you need them, including:

    Get all the resources

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.