December 16, 2020

Around the nation: HHS nixes referral requirement for faith-based organizations

Daily Briefing

    Under a newly finalized rule, faith-based organizations in order to receive federal funding will no longer have to inform customers about services they don't provide because of religious reasons or refer those customers to other providers for those services, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.

    • District of Columbia: HHS on Monday finalized a rule that will change the requirements faith-based health care organization must meet in order to receive federal funding. Under the rule, in order to receive federal funding, faith-based organizations will no longer have to inform customers about services they don't provide because of religious reasons or refer those customers to other providers for those services. The rule also states that HHS will not discriminate against faith-based organizations when reviewing applications for federal grants or awards. The final rule is scheduled to take effect next month (Brady, Modern Healthcare, 12/14).
    • North Carolina: Thermo Fisher Scientific announced that it plans to spend $500 million expanding its Greenville facilities. The expansion will include a new, 130,000-square-foot facility for the company's sterile drug product development and commercial manufacturing, which the company expects to open by 2022 (Huffman, Triad Business Journal, 12/12).
    • Pennsylvania: Allegheny Health Network on Thursday named Veronica Villalobos as its new VP of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Villalobos has previously served as principal deputy associate director at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and as chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's Federal Hispanic Work Group (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 12/10).

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