September 11, 2020

Around the nation: Nearly 800 US children have developed rare, coronavirus-linked inflammatory syndrome

Daily Briefing

    CDC last week said, as of Sep. 3, officials in 42 states, New York City, and Washington, D.C., had reported a total of 792 confirmed cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome and 16 deaths linked to the condition among children, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the Connecticut, Georgia, and Maryland.

    • Connecticut: Cigna on Wednesday announced that it will increase the number of counties where it sells individual health plans through the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) exchanges by 27%, to a total of more than 300 counties across 10 states, for the 2021 coverage year. Cigna said most of its exchange plans—which will be available in Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Virginia during the ACA's upcoming open enrollment period—will include several features that will be available to enrollees at no out-of-pocket cost, including "virtual care that now includes behavioral health providers for most plans" and a diabetes care plan that will be available in most counties. Cigna's announcement comes after several Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, Centene, Oscar Health, and other insurers said they plan to offer more individual plans on the ACA's exchanges for the 2021 coverage year, Forbes reports (Japsen, Forbes, 9/9).

    • Georgia: CDC last week said that, as of Sep. 3, officials in 42 states, New York City, and Washington, D.C., had reported a total of 792 confirmed cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C)—a rare but severe condition associated with the novel coronavirus—and 16 deaths linked to the condition among children. CDC said 99% of the reported MIS-C cases occurred among children who tested positive for the coronavirus and 1% of cases occurred among children who had been exposed to a person who was infected with the virus. According to CDC, more than 70% of the reported MIS-C cases occurred among Hispanic or Black children (CBS News, 9/9; CDC website, 9/3).

    • Maryland: Boston Children's Hospital CEO Sandra Fenwick plans to retire in March, hospital officials announced Wednesday. Fenwick began her career at Boston Children's as SVP for business development in 1999. She then served as the hospital's president in 2008, and assumed the role of CEO in 2013. Officials said the hospital's board of trustees is set to begin planning for Fenwick's departure (Dumcius, Boston Business Journal, 9/9).
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