July 28, 2020

Around the nation: FDA to require opioid drug labels, clinicians to mention naloxone

Daily Briefing

    FDA announced the new requirements after CDC earlier this month released data showing that overdose deaths related to opioid drugs in the United States reached an all-time high last year, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, Iowa, Maryland, and Nevada.

    • Maryland: FDA on Thursday announced it will require that drug manufacturers include information about naloxone, which can reverse the effects of an opioid-drug related overdose, on the labels of prescription opioids. The agency said it also will require clinicians to tell patients about naloxone when prescribing opioid drugs. FDA announced the new requirements after CDC earlier this month released data showing that overdose deaths related to opioid drugs in the United States reached an all-time high last year. FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said the new requirements "can help further raise awareness about this potentially life-saving treatment for individuals that may be at greater risk of an overdose and those in the community most likely to observe an overdose" (Facher, STAT News, 7/23;Perrone, Associated Press, 7/23).

    • District of Columbia/Nevada: The Supreme Court on Friday voted 5-4 to reject reviewing a Nevada church's lawsuit seeking to block the state from enforcing a 50-person attendance cap on religious services due to America's coronavirus epidemic. The decision effectively ends the lawsuit filed by Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley, which claimed that Nevada's attendance caps are unfair to religious institutions, because other businesses are permitted to operate at half-capacity, which could more than 50 people. The Supreme Court previously rejected a similar lawsuit filed by a California church (Johnson, The Hill, 7/25; Liptak, New York Times, 7/24).

    • Iowa: Blue Cross and Blue Shield insurer Wellmark has named Cory Harris as its next CEO. Harris, who is currently the company's president and COO, will begin serving as the insurer's CEO in 2021. Harris succeeds John Forsyth, who is retiring after working for the Blues insurer for 24 years (Livingston, Modern Healthcare, 7/23).

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