April 20, 2020

Around the nation: North Dakota governor announces plan to reopen the state beginning May 1

Daily Briefing

    The governor's plan details three phases for how Colorado will gradually reopen businesses that were closed under the state's efforts to combat the new coronavirus epidemic, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Colorado, New York, and North Dakota.

    • Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis (D) on Wednesday outlined three phases for how Colorado will gradually reopen businesses that were closed under the state's efforts to combat the new coronavirus epidemic. However, Polis cautioned that the plan requires the state to practice some social distancing until there is a cure or vaccine for the virus. "The virus isn't going to disappear or go away any time soon," Polis said, adding, "We need a way of life that is sustainable … psychologically, economically, and socially." Polis plans to lift Colorado's statewide stay-at-home order by April 26 (Tabachnik, The Denver Post, 4/15).

    • New York: New York Attorney General Letitia James (D) on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration claiming a federal rule unveiled by the Department of Labor this month illegally limits paid sick leave for workers who are impacted by Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. James said she's challenging the rule, which generally requires that employees who are unable to work receive paid sick leave, because the rule also states that employers do not have to provide paid sick leave if they determine there is no work for an employee, and it excludes some health care workers from receiving leave (Pierson, Reuters, 4/14).

    • North Dakota: Gov. Doug Burgum (R) on Wednesday released guidelines to reopen on May 1 North Dakota businesses that were closed because of the new coronavirus epidemic. According to Burgum's office, the state's Department of Commerce will collaborate with business associations to establish safety requirements for gradually reopening the state. The safety measures could include limits on the number of customers allowed inside certain businesses at one time, mandatory health protocols, and daily disinfection practices (Resnick-Ault, Reuters, 4/16).
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