February 26, 2020

Around the nation: Appeals court upholds Trump admin's Title X rule

Daily Briefing

    The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals this week upheld the Trump administration's final rule that prohibits clinics that receive federal funding through the Title X program from referring women to abortion providers, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from the District of Columbia, Minnesota, and Ohio.

    • District of Columbia: The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a 7-4 ruling issued Monday upheld the Trump administration's final rule that prohibits clinics that receive federal funding through the Title X program from referring women to abortion providers and from sharing office space with abortion providers. The appeals court's decision overturns rulings from lower courts in California, Oregon, and Washington that had struck down and blocked the final rule. Department of Justice spokesperson Mollie Timmons said the latest ruling is in line with Congress' longtime prohibition of using Title X to fund abortion, but the American Medical Association criticized the decision, saying the final rule amounts to "government overreach and interference" in the care physicians may provide to their patients (Johnson, Associated Press, 2/24; Goldstein, Washington Post, 2/24; Dolan, Los Angeles Times, 2/24).

    • Minnesota: Robin Roberts, an anchor for "Good Morning America" on ABC, has been elected as a public trustee to the Mayo Clinic's board of trustees. According to the Clinic, Roberts has spoken publicly about her own diagnosis of breast cancer as well as myelodysplastic syndrome and has worked with the nonprofit Be the Match to raise awareness about the need for bone marrow donors. Gianrico Farrugia, Mayo Clinic's president and CEO, said, "[Roberts] will bring invaluable perspective, given her incredible ability to overcome her own health adversities to become a leading voice and advocate for others" (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 2/21).

    • Ohio: Cincinnati Children's has received a $36 million gift from Convalescent Hospital for Children, marking the largest gift Cincinnati Children's has ever received. Cincinnati Children's will use the donation to improve mental health care services for children and teens, including funding a five-story inpatient behavioral health facility at the hospital's campus in College Hill (Paavola, Becker's Hospital CFO Report, 2/24).
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