June 26, 2018

Around the nation: CMS tells St. Luke's it will lose Medicare heart transplant funding

Daily Briefing

    In a statement, Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center said, "Our unwavering focus is always to ensure our patients receive the best possible medical care, and in ways that reflect our core values of reverence, integrity, compassion, and excellence."

    • Michigan: Gov. Rick Snyder (R) on Friday signed a bill that would make Michigan the fifth state to adopt Medicaid work requirements. The plan is subject to CMS approval. Under the measure, certain Medicaid beneficiaries would be required to work 80 hours or more per month to keep coverage. The work requirements would apply to the state's Medicaid expansion population and would not apply to children or individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or have disabilities (Sullivan, The Hill, 6/22; Oosting, Detroit News, 6/22).

    • Ohio: The Cleveland Clinic has named Adam Myers as chief of population health and director of Cleveland Clinic Community Care, effective June 18. Myers has previously served as SVP, CMO, and COO of Texas Health Physicians Group/Enterprise and as SVP and CMO of Methodist Health System (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 6/22).

    • Texas: CMS on Friday told Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center that the hospital will lose Medicare funding for its heart transplant program Aug. 17 because the hospital has not sufficiently addressed issues that endanger patients. CMS in January had cited the program for having outcomes that were significantly worse than expected. In response to the January letter, St. Luke's said the problems had been fixed and sought reconsideration based on mitigating factors. However, CMS in the latest letter denied that request. St. Luke's in a statement said it thinks it is eligible for additional corrective action, such as a systems improvement agreement that "would provide a long-term path forward for [the] program." However, Charles Ornstein and Mike Hixenbaugh report for ProPublica and the Houston Chronicle that when a systems improvement agreement is available, CMS usually offers it first, and the agency did not offer one in this case. The hospital in a statement said, "Our unwavering focus is always to ensure our patients receive the best possible medical care, and in ways that reflect our core values of reverence, integrity, compassion, and excellence" (Ornstein/Hixenbaugh, Houston Chronicle/ProPublica, 6/22).

    Next, get our transplant market updates

    xxx

    To understand the transplant market, see what the current, near future, and far future landscapes of solid organ transplants look like. Our popular slides on the transplant market are updated with the latest market trends in 2018.

    This presentation covers everything from organ supply and demand to organ allocation and innovations in pharmaceuticals and technology.

    Get the Slides

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.