March 26, 2018

Around the nation: Children's Minnesota saved her life as a child. Now she's a doctor there.

Daily Briefing

    Jennifer Pratt was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a form of bone cancer, when she was 11, but now she's cancer-free and working as a hospitalist at Children's Minnesota in St. Paul, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California, Minnesota, and New Jersey.

    • California: Mission Hospital Foundation has received the largest gift in its history from Judi and Bill Leonard, who requested to keep the specific amount of their eight-figure donation private. In honor of the donation, Mission will name its cancer institute the Judi and Bill Leonard Institute for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Wellness at Mission Hospital. The institute is currently under construction (Paavola, Becker's CFO Report, 3/22).

    • Minnesota: Jennifer Pratt was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a form of bone cancer, when she was 11, but now she's cancer-free and working as a hospitalist at Children's Minnesota in St. Paul—the same hospital where she stayed at as cancer patient. Pratt graduated from Midwestern University's medical school in Chicago and said she's "always wanted to work at Children's" (Leguizamon, CNN, 3/22).

    • New Jersey: Cooper Health Care, Lourdes Health System, Virtua Health, and Jefferson Health have agreed to make a bulk purchase of naloxone to distribute to Camden police officers. Louis Cappelli, the Camden County Freeholder director, said that the new partnership "will provide a critical tool" to help fight the opioid epidemic and "ensure that police have [Naloxone] with them on the streets" (George, Philadelphia Business Journal, 3/22).

    5 myths physicians believe about patient experience

    5 myths physicians believe about patient experience

    Excellent patient experience is a critical piece of modern medicine, reflected clearly in outcomes. And more than amenities, clean rooms, or quiet during night, the factors that most inflect patient experience all relate to communication and coordination among the care team—factors that physicians are in a unique position to influence.

    Clinician-patient communication, leadership of the care team, and support and empathy for the patient across the unit are the most important factors for success, and they're all driven by the physician as the "Influencer in Chief."

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