March 16, 2018

Around the nation: Authorities identify gunman, victims in UAB shooting

Daily Briefing

    The victims are Nancy Swift, a nursing manager at UAB Hospital-Highlands who was killed in the attack, and Tim Isley, an employee with sterile-supply company Steris who was injured in the attack, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Alabama, Florida, and Virginia.

    • Alabama: Authorities have identified the gunman and the two victims involved a shooting on Wednesday night at UAB Hospital-Highlands. The victims are Nancy Swift, a nursing manager at UAB who was killed in the attack, and Tim Isley, an employee with sterile-supply company Steris who was injured in the attack. The gunman, who died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, was Trevis Coleman, a UAB employee disgruntled by an "employee relations issues," according to Lt. Peter Williston, spokesperson for the Birmingham Police Department. Williston said police are still investigating exactly what motivated the shooting (WBRC Fox 6, 3/15; Reeves, AP/U.S. News & World Report, 3/15).

    • Florida: Just days before his 23rd wedding anniversary, a Florida man donated his kidney to his wife—marking the first live donor kidney transplant at Memorial Regional Hospital. The couple, whose wedding anniversary is March 15, was discharged from the hospital early after a successful procedure involving more than 30 health care providers (AP/Sacramento Bee, 3/14).

    • Virginia: Inova Health System Wednesday announced it has picked J. Stephen Jones as its next CEO. Currently, Jones is president of Cleveland Clinic's network of hospital and health care centers. He'll start the job April 9. Outgoing CEO Knox Singleton announced in September that he would retire (Jouvenal, Washington Post, 3/14).

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