June 6, 2017

Around the nation: Man reunites with nurse and police officer who saved his life

Daily Briefing
    • Florida: BayCare Health System has named Sarah Naumowich as president of Morton Plant North Bay Hospital in New Port Richey, Florida. Naumowich, who had been acting as interim president since January, previously served as the director of operations at the hospital. Naumowich succeeds Mike Yungmann (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 6/2).

    • Iowa: More than 25 students at Holmes Junior High in Cedar Falls, Iowa, made 10 brightly colored fidget quilts for dementia patients in the hospice unit at UnityPoint Health-Allen Hospital. The multi-textured quilts are designed to accommodate dementia patients' urge to move their hands, with squares that have buttons, metal snaps, or things that will tie or fasten. "[The quilts] are very calming, the ability to be able to touch and feel things," said Jennifer Driscoll, the hospice unit manager. "[Patients] need things to do rather than picking at their clothing" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/4)

    • Nebraska: On Thursday, John Niemoth, a 67-year-old man from Nebraska, reunited with the off-duty police officer and the nurse who saved his life earlier this year. According to Live Well Nebraska, the incident occurred when Niemoth experienced a heart attack while driving, causing him to run a red light and collide with a vehicle. Fortunately, Megan Steingraber, a nurse, and Aaron Gurzick, an off-duty police officer, saw the accident and stopped to help, performing CPR on Niemoth until paramedics arrived. Their actions saved Niemoth's life, and on Thursday, the three reunited (Stewart, Live Well Nebraska, 6/3).

    Nurse-led opportunities to achieve sustainable cost savings

    In health care settings, rising costs over time have outpaced gains made in productivity, leading to unprecedented cost pressures. As a consequence of this financially-constrained environment, many health care executives look to find short- to medium-term savings within the nursing labor budget. Yet, as guardians of care quality, nurse executives understand that imprecise cuts to personnel can have adverse care outcomes.

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