October 19, 2020

Around the nation: Avoid NSAIDs during the last 4 months of pregnancy, FDA warns

Daily Briefing

    The agency says pregnant women should avoid using a group of pain relievers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—which include common over-the-counter pain relievers, such as Advil and Aleve—during their last four months of pregnancy, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Maryland, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.

    • Maryland: FDA in a release issued Thursday warned that pregnant women should avoid using a common group of pain relievers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during their last four months of pregnancy. FDA said NSAIDs—which include common over-the-counter pain relievers, such as Advil and Aleve—could cause rare but serious fetal kidney problems that can result in low levels of amniotic fluid and pregnancy complications. The agency also will require manufacturers of the drugs to update the drugs' labels to recommend that pregnant women limit their NSAID use to "between about 20 weeks to 30 weeks of pregnancy." The warning does not apply to low-dose aspirin when recommended by a physician (Perrone, Associated Press, 10/15; D'Ambrosio, MedPage Today, 10/15; FDA release, 10/15).

    • Tennessee: Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital has tapped Lee Ann Liska, who has more than three decades of health care experience, to serve as its COO effective Oct. 19. Liska has been working as a strategic and health system operational consultant since 2019. She previously served as Augusta University Medical Center's CEO and EVP of health affairs, and as University of Cincinnati Medical Center's CEO and president (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 10/13).

    • Wisconsin: Wisconsin on Wednesday opened a field hospital at State Fair Park to help treat the state's recent surge in patients with Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Wisconsin's number of hospitalized Covid-19 patients has increased threefold over the past month, and several hospitals in the state have reached or exceeded their capacity. The field hospital will treat Covid-19 patients between the ages of 18 and 70 who require hospitalization but are not critically ill (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 10/15).

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