September 21, 2020

Weekly review: 500,000 fewer births next year? What Covid-19 could mean for pregnancy.

Daily Briefing

    500,000 fewer births next year? What Covid-19 could mean for pregnancy. (Monday, September 14)
    Six months into the Covid-19 epidemic, a new trend has emerged with the potential to dramatically reshape pregnancy care in the United States: a significant decrease in births. Here's what experts project will happen to birth volumes next year—and three ways you can respond.

    'Fever checks' are popping up in restaurants and offices. But do they actually work? (Tuesday, September 15)
    Restaurants, offices, and other locations open for business amid the coronavirus pandemic are increasingly relying on temperature checks to screen people for infection—but federal officials and public health experts say the practice is largely performative. Here's what they recommend instead.

    3 ways to change someone's mind (Wednesday, September 16)
    Leaders often must win buy-in from colleagues, partners, and clients who may be skeptical of or disagree with their decisions and choices. Writing for Harvard Business Review, Laura Huang and Ryan Yu detail three strategies that may help leaders change someone's mind.

    15 tips to boost your work-from-home productivity (Thursday, September 17)
    Are you working from home now more than ever? Here are 15 tips from Advisory Board's Ryan Furr-Johnson and Taylor Hurst on how to adapt to your new "office" environment, boost your productivity, and create a more positive work-from-home experience.

    The odds a coronavirus vaccine works? 'Not as high as some might think.' (Friday, September 18)
    While we are all "rooting for the success" of coronavirus vaccine candidates in Phase 3 trials, the odds of success are "not as high as some might think"—and Americans need to reset their expectations accordingly, Peter Lurie, former associate commissioner for public health strategy and analysis at FDA, writes for the Washington Post.

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