September 8, 2020

Weekly review: A vaccine approval is coming. Get ready to ask these 8 questions.

Daily Briefing

    Do you sound cranky today? Amazon's new wearable will track that. (Monday, August 31)
    Amazon recently unveiled its first wellness wearable, a device called Halo that can track your body fat, exercise—and even your mood. Advisory Board's John League weighs in on the device's potential, and what it could mean for medical interoperability and privacy.

    Coronavirus tests are extremely sensitive. (That could be a problem, experts say.) (Tuesday, September 1)
    The most commonly used type of coronavirus test in America could be generating positive results for people who might not be contagious, according to some public health experts—but the experts say that doesn't necessarily mean the country should be testing less, Apoorva Mandavilli reports for the New York Times.

    Why the '6-foot rule' might not stop the coronavirus (Wednesday, September 2)
    Public health guidelines say you should keep six feet of distance from others to stop the coronavirus from spreading—but is six feet really enough? Here's what a new BMJ analysis reveals about the risk, Ben Guarino reports for the Washington Post.

    A vaccine approval is coming. Get ready to ask these 8 questions. (Thursday, September 3)
    The moment is coming when FDA will approve a Covid-19 vaccine—but some experts already are questioning whether the approval process will truly ensure the vaccine's safety and efficacy. Advisory Board's Brandi Greenberg offers eight questions as a "cognitive toolkit" to help you evaluate whether the approval process was effective.

    How Covid-19 is affecting kids, in 4 charts (Friday, September 4)
    Hospitalizations and deaths from the novel coronavirus are rising more quickly among young people than among the rest of the population—and Black and Hispanic youth are especially affected, according to new data from the American Academy of Pediatrics and CDC. View the latest data on our interactive charts.

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