June 26, 2020

Around the nation: 3 states say they'll require quarantines for visitors from coronavirus hotspots

Daily Briefing

    Visitors from eight states where cases of the new coronavirus are rising rapidly will be required to self-quarantine for two weeks upon entering Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Wisconsin.

    • Connecticut/New Jersey/New York: Visitors from eight states where cases of the new coronavirus are rising rapidly will be required to quarantine for two weeks upon entering Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York, the three states' governors announced Wednesday. The quarantine orders will apply to visitors coming from Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah (Goodman, New York Times, 6/24; Allen/Szekely, Reuters, 6/24).

    • Pennsylvania: Bayer AG on Wednesday announced it will pay up to $10.9 billion to settle tens of thousands of lawsuits filed against the company that argue its weedkiller, Roundup, causes cancer. Bayer under the settlement will pay between $8.8 billion and $9.6 billion to settle lawsuits from around 95,000 plaintiffs who have agreed to the deal, as well as about 30,000 additional claims that haven't yet agreed to a settlement. The company will pay another $1.25 billion to resolve any future claims. Bayer under the settlement agreement does not admit to any wrongdoing, and the company will continue selling Roundup, the Wall Street Journal reports (Bender et. al., Wall Street Journal, 6/24; Denham, Washington Post, 6/24).

    • Wisconsin: Because of the country's coronavirus epidemic, Democratic National Committee officials on Wednesday announced that the committee will hold an almost entirely virtual Democratic convention in Milwaukee from Aug. 17 to 20. The officials said former Vice President Joe Biden currently is scheduled to accept the Democratic Party's 2020 nomination for president in person at the convention, but most of the convention's other official business—such as officially casting delegates' votes for Biden's nomination—will be conducted virtually (Scherer, Washington Post, 6/24; Barrow, Associated Press, 6/24; Thomas/Glazer, Wall Street Journal, 6/24).
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