May 18, 2020

Around the nation: This Alabama congressional candidate donated her kidney to a stranger

Daily Briefing

    Kiani Gardner, a Democratic congressional candidate in Alabama, on April 30 donated her kidney to Alabama resident Tyson Bell, who had been living with polycystic kidney disease for years, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Alabama, California, and Michigan.

    • Alabama: Kiani Gardner, a Democratic congressional candidate in Alabama, on April 30 donated her kidney to Alabama resident Tyson Bell, who had been living with polycystic kidney disease for years. Gardner, who began the process to become a kidney donor about two years ago, said she did not expect to donate her kidney during the country's new coronavirus epidemic. Gardner said that she was required to self-isolate prior to the surgery. "It was an inconvenient time to give a kidney, but in the grand scheme of things it's no less convenient than to have your kidneys fail," she said (Manchester, The Hill, 5/12).

    • California: Telemedicine provider Doctor on Demand on Wednesday announced that its services are now available to 33 million Medicare Part B beneficiaries. The move makes Doctor on Demand "the first big telemedicine provider to cater to" Part B beneficiaries, Forbes' Katie Jennings reports (Jennings, Forbes, 5/13).

    • Michigan: The Mackinac Center Legal Foundation on Tuesday filed a lawsuit on behalf of four medical providers and one patient in Michigan against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D), claiming that Whitmer's state of emergency declaration over the new coronavirus unlawfully requires medical providers to postpone or cancel "so-called 'non-essential' procedures." The lawsuit argues that the emergency declaration, which the state first implemented on March 10, was based on "grossly inaccurate" projections from CDC regarding the new coronavirus' potential spread. The lawsuit claims that the curve of new coronavirus cases "has flattened" in Michigan, and although "dire predictions of overwhelmed hospitals have not come to pass … medical providers are on the brink of financial ruin, facing extreme revenue shortages caused by [Whitmer's] order." According to Mlive, Whitmer's administration in recent weeks has told providers they could begin resuming normal operations and encouraged patients to begin rescheduling previously canceled procedures (Burns, Mlive, 5/13).
    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.