March 17, 2020

Around the nation: Tennessee man donates his stockpile of 17,700 bottles of hand sanitizer

Daily Briefing

    Before he donated his supply, Matt Colvin had sold 300 bottles of hand sanitizer on Amazon at a marked-up price, which resulted in Amazon pulling his listing and warning sellers they would be suspended if they gouged prices, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Oregon and Tennessee.

    • Oregon: Health care providers and public health agencies around the world are turning to Twitter to keep the public informed about the new coronavirus. For example, Yale Tung Chen, an ED physician at Hospital Universitario La Paz in Madrid, tested positive for COVID-19—the disease caused by the new coronavirus—went into quarantine, and began posting live updates of his condition, including ultrasound scans of his lungs, to educate the public. Meanwhile, Esther Choo, an ED physician and associate professor at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, has posted tweets on how to combat xenophobia amid the spread of misinformation linking COVID-19 to racial groups. Separately, the World Health Organization posted a video on the new coronavirus on the video app TikTok (Lovett, MobiHealthNews, 3/11).

    • Tennessee: A Tennessee man who amassed 17,700 bottles of hand sanitizer and drew public criticism for selling the products at a markup on Amazon on Sunday donated his entire stockpile as the Tennessee attorney general's (AG's) office started to investigate him for alleged price gouging. Matt Colvin, an Amazon seller, donated two-thirds of his supplies of antibacterial wipes and hand sanitizer to a local church to distribute to people across the state. Officials from the Tennessee AG's office collected the remaining one-third to distribute in Kentucky, where Colvin had acquired some of the products. Before he donated his supply, Colvin had sold 300 bottles of hand sanitizer on Amazon at a marked-up price, which resulted in Amazon pulling his listing from the website and warning sellers they would be suspended if they gouged prices (Nicas, New York Times, 3/15).

    • Tennessee: Don Webb, Williamson Medical Center's CEO, plans to retire at the end of 2020. Webb began his career at the medical center 35 years ago as a controller in 1985. He then served as the medical center's CFO for 16 years before being named Williamson's CEO in 2012. As CEO, Webb has overseen the opening of Williamson County's first pediatric ED and orthopedics facility (Gooch, Becker's Hospital Review, 3/12).
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