November 21, 2019

Around the nation: Kaiser Permanente to name medical school after Bernard Tyson

Daily Briefing

    Interim Chair and CEO Gregory Adams said the late Bernard Tyson "spent his entire career focused on ensuring greater access to affordable, high-quality health care for all, and I know the school that now bears his name will help carry this legacy into the future," in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California, Illinois, and Pennsylvania.

    • California: Kaiser Permanente on Monday announced it will name its new medical school after former Chair and CEO Bernard Tyson, who died unexpectedly on Nov. 11. Interim Chair and CEO Gregory Adams said Tyson "spent his entire career focused on ensuring greater access to affordable, high-quality health care for all, and I know the school that now bears his name will help carry this legacy into the future." The school's first cohort of students will start next summer (Porter, HealthLeaders, 11/19).

    • Illinois: Chicago's Department of Public Health on Tuesday launched Family Connects Chicago, a nurse home-visiting service for families with newborns. Through the service, RNs will visit families about three weeks after birth to perform health assessments of the mother and baby, including anxiety and depression screenings and weight checks. The nurses will also provide education on newborn care, including tips for safe sleep and feeding. Parents will have the option to enroll in the service while in the hospital after birth. The free service is currently available at four Chicago hospitals, but city health officials plan to have the service available at all birthing hospitals in the city within five years (Bowen, Chicago Tribune, 11/19).

    • Pennsylvania: The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) on Wednesday agreed to join the ECRI Institute as a subsidiary starting next year. ECRI Institute President and CEO Marcus Schabacker said ISMP's focus on preventing medication errors would complement ECRI's focus on patient safety. The deal, which is pending final approval by Pennsylvania regulators, could form one of the largest patient safety organizations in the country (Johnson, Modern Healthcare, 11/15).

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