Around the nation: Texas eyes Uber, Lyft services to transport Medicaid beneficiaries

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

Texas lawmakers have introduced a bill that would allow managed care companies to use Uber, Lyft, and other ridesharing services to transport Medicaid patients to their medical appointments, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from California, Illinois, and Texas.

  • California: Cedars-Sinai will partner with Providence St. Joseph on its $540 million expansion project in Tarzana. Providence will retain a controlling interest in the expansion, which is expected to be completed in 2022 (Porter, HealthLeaders Media, 3/13).

  • Illinois: Rush University System for Health CEO Larry Goodman announced Wednesday that he will be retiring this summer. Goodman has been the CEO of Rush since February 2002. After Goodman's retirement, Ranga Krishnan, the current dean of Rush Medical College and SVP of Rush University Medical Center (RUMC), will become CEO of the health system, while Omar Lateef, CMO of the health system, will become CEO of RUMC (Kacik, Modern Healthcare, 3/13).

  • Texas: Texas lawmakers have introduced a bill that would allow Medicaid managed care companies to pay ridesharing services, such as Uber and Lyft, to transport Medicaid beneficiaries to their appointments. The state currently pays for transportation for Medicaid beneficiaries, but those trips have to be scheduled two days in advance. The new legislation would allow managed care companies to order rides for patients who can't provide notice in advance—for example, if a patient is discharged from the hospital or comes down with a sudden illness (Morris, Houston Chronicle, 3/12).

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