Weekly review: How 24 health system CEOs want to grow in 2019. (Hint: M&A isn't the priority.)

He thought he had a 'beer belly.' It was actually a 77-pound tumor. (Monday, Feb. 25)
Hector Hernandez's friends used to joke that he had a "beer belly"—but Hernandez's "beer belly" wasn't what it appeared to be. After initially being told some people just gain weight in certain places, Hernandez was diagnosed with a condition that ended up taking one of his kidneys.

How 24 health system CEOs want to grow in 2019. (Hint: M&A isn't the priority.) (Tuesday, Feb. 26)
In this year's Modern Healthcare Power Panel CEO survey, 12.5% of CEOs said mergers and acquisitions best describe their growth strategy, compared with 25.8% of CEOs in 2018.

Your iPhone may be secretly sharing private health data with Facebook (Wednesday, Feb. 27)
At least six of the top 15 health and fitness apps in Apple's App Store have been sharing sensitive health information with Facebook—even if the user isn't connected to Facebook, and often without disclosing their data-sharing practices, according to a Wall Street Journal investigation.

This patient left the ED 'happy as a clam.' Then came the $48K bill. (Thursday, Feb. 28)
After Jeannette Parker was bitten by a stray cat last September, she sought an emergency rabies vaccine and left the ED feeling "happy as a clam." Then she received a $48,512 bill—and the hospital is standing by its charges, despite having since lowered its chargemaster price for similar treatments to $9,900.

This journalist is one of America's 'Top Doctors.' (Spoiler: He's not a doctor.) (Friday, March 1)
Marshall Allen was surprised when he learned he'd been named a "Top Doctor" in America—mostly because he's not a doctor at all. So how did Allen end up receiving the award, and why was he expected to pay $289 for a plaque commemorating the honor? Writing for ProPublica, Allen shares what he uncovered about the sometimes-shady world of physician awards.


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