February 28, 2019

Health insurance in America, in 3 charts

Daily Briefing

    About 29.7 million U.S. residents—or about 9.2% of the population—were uninsured during the first nine months of 2018, marking no "significant change" from the previous year, according to CDC data released Wednesday.

    Health insurance 101: Get the slide decks

    The data is based on responses from 61,484 U.S. residents who participated in the 2018 National Health Interview Survey during the first nine months of the year.

    Findings on coverage rates

    The data show the uninsured population during the first nine months of 2018 was "not significantly different from 2017," when 29.3 million U.S. residents, or about 9.1% of the population, were uninsured.

    According to CDC, U.S. adults ages 25 to 34 were the most likely to not have health insurance during the first nine months of 2018, with an uninsured rate of 17.1%. The data showed adults living in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were more likely to be insured than adults living in non-expansion states during the first nine months of 2018. According to the data, Medicaid expansion states had an uninsured rate of 9.6%, compared with 18.5% in non-expansion states.

    In addition, CDC noted that, during the first nine months of 2018, U.S. adults ages 18 to 64 were more likely to be uninsured if they lived in states that relied on the federal exchange for ACA enrollment when compared with adults who lived in states that ran their own exchange or ran an exchange in partnership with the federal government.

    Overall, CDC said "significant decreases were observed in the uninsured rates" among U.S. adults ages 18 to 64 from 2013 through the first nine months of 2018.

    Findings on types of health coverage

    The data showed 19.7% of U.S. residents were enrolled in public health plans during the first nine months of 2018, while 69% were enrolled in private health plans. CDC estimated a total of 136.7 million U.S. residents had private health coverage during the first nine months of 2018, including 8.2 million who were enrolled in ACA exchange plans.

    According to the data, 45.6% of U.S. residents enrolled in private health plans were enrolled in a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) during the first nine months of 2018, up from 43.7% in 2017.

    The data showed 20.6% of individuals enrolled in private health plans were enrolled in an HDHP with a health savings account (HSA), up from 18.2% in 2017, and 25% were enrolled in an HDHP without an HSA (Frieden, MedPage Today, 2/27; Galvin, U.S. News & World Report, 2/27).

    Cheat sheet: What you need to know about the ACA

    book

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as the ACA, is the comprehensive health care reform bill passed by Congress in March, 2010. The law reshapes the way health care is delivered and financed by transitioning providers from a volume-based fee-for-service system toward value-based care.

    Download the ACA cheat sheet to get a quick overview of this significant U.S. health care legislation.

    Get the Cheat Sheet

    Have a Question?

    x

    Ask our experts a question on any topic in health care by visiting our member portal, AskAdvisory.

    X
    Cookies help us improve your website experience. By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies.