Around the nation: 3 new cases of adenovirus at University of Maryland

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

Three more cases of adenovirus have been diagnosed at the University of Maryland in College Park, marking nine total confirmed cases of the virus at the university in recent weeks, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Maryland, Michigan, and Minnesota.

  • Maryland: Three more cases of adenovirus have been diagnosed at the University of Maryland in College Park, marking nine total confirmed cases of the virus at the university in recent weeks. According to officials, six cases of adenovirus had been reported before Thanksgiving, and one student died after being diagnosed with the illness (Hedgpeth, Washington Post, 11/27). 

  • Michigan: Sparrow Health System has named Emory Wayne Tibbs as president and CEO effective January 2019. Tibbs previously served as CEO of Centra Health and as president and CEO of Southside Community Hospital, both in Virginia. Tibbs will succeed Sparrow's President and CEO Dennis Swan, who is retiring (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 11/27).

  • Minnesota: UnitedHealth Group on Tuesday launched individual health records (IHRs) for 50 million consumers. The company said these records will be "fully integrated and fully portable," and UnitedHealthcare CEO Steve Nelson said the IHRs will "connec[t] numerous [EHRs], creating a unified and secure source of truth for both consumers and care providers, and unlocking the value of data that is currently trapped in today's fragmented health system." Daily Briefing is published by Advisory Board Research, a division of Optum, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of UnitedHealth Group. UnitedHealth Group separately owns UnitedHealthcare (Japsen, Forbes, 11/27).

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