September 4, 2018

Weekly review: The 25 best hospitals to work for, according to Indeed

Daily Briefing

    The 4 ways Sen. John McCain changed health care (and 2 more ways he tried) (Monday, Aug. 27)
    Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who died on August 25, was a decorated Navy pilot and prisoner of war in Vietnam whose 30-year Capitol Hill career left a lasting mark on health policy—well beyond his famous "thumbs-down" vote that saved the Affordable Care Act last summer.

    He's insured. But he still owes $108,951.31 for an ED visit. Here's why.  (Tuesday, Aug. 28)
    While several states have policies on the books to ensure patients' medical costs are covered when they're treated out of network during an emergency, a "loophole" in these laws can leave patients with unexpected high bills. That's what happened to Drew Calver of Texas after he received care for a heart attack, Kaiser Health News reports.

    Is one drink per day really dangerous? Behind the hype of a major new study. (Wednesday, Aug. 29)
    The Lancet recently published an analysis examining the benefits and harms of alcohol worldwide, and the news media framed its findings in alarming tones, warning that "there's no safe amount of alcohol." But Aaron Carroll in the New York Times' "The Upshot" explains why the actual takeaway is "much less newsy and much more measured."

    The 25 best hospitals to work for, according to Indeed (Thursday, Aug. 30)
    Indeed has released its 2018 "Top-Rated Workplaces" lists for hospitals and health care organizations. Find out which employers took the top spots.

    The 'worst way to start your day,' and 7 more restaurant meals that you probably shouldn't eat  (Friday, Aug. 31)
    A Chili's chicken-and-waffle dish that's equivalent to "five Krispy Kreme glazed doughnuts smothered in 30 McDonald's Chicken McNuggets." A 2,700-calorie Cheesecake Factory breakfast burrito. A BJ's peanut butter and smores "pizookie" with 135 grams of added sugar. These are among the nutritional disasters recognized by the Center for Science in the Public Interest in this year's Xtreme Eating Awards, the New York Times reports.

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