May 2, 2018

Around the nation: Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor 'resting comfortably' after shoulder surgery

Daily Briefing

    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is "resting comfortably" after having shoulder-replacement surgery Tuesday morning, according to Supreme Court spokesperson Kathleen Arberg, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Maine, New Jersey, and Washington, D.C.

    • Maine: Advocacy groups have filed a lawsuit against Maine's Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) seeking to compel the state to begin expanding its Medicaid program in accordance with a recently approved ballot initiative. Maine residents in 2017 voted to approve a ballot measure (Maine Question 2) to expand the state's Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act, and to require the state to submit by April 3 an application formally notifying the federal government of its plan to expand Medicaid (Pradhan, Politico, 4/30).

    • New Jersey: Hackensack Meridian Health's Jersey Shore University Medical Center is expected to open its $265 million new outpatient tower in late spring or early summer. The tower will be 10 stories, 300,000 square feet, and will feature a simulation center for infusion patients, a maternity care ward, a pediatric care unit, and physician offices (Paavola, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/30).

    • Washington, D.C.: Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is "resting comfortably" after having shoulder-replacement surgery Tuesday morning, according to Supreme Court spokesperson Kathleen Arberg. Sotomayor broke her shoulder in a fall at her home on April 16 and required "reverse total shoulder replacement surgery." She will be in a sling for the next few weeks but is expected to make a full recovery (Wheeler, The Hill, 5/1).

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