Around the nation: Controversial statue of doctor who experimented on slaves removed

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

A controversial statue of James Marion Sims, the so-called "father of modern gynecology" whose developments came in part from nonconsensual experimentation on black female slaves, has been removed, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Florida, New York, and Washington, D.C.

  • Florida: Bayfront Health Spring Hill has named Michael Irvin as CEO, effective May 8. Irvin previously served as COO of Merit Health Wesley in Mississippi (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 4/16).

  • New York: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) ordered a controversial statue of James Marion Sims be removed on Tuesday from its location in Central Park and relocated to Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, where Sims is buried. Sims, also known as the "father of modern gynecology," has been a controversial figure because his medical developments came in part from nonconsensual experimentation on black female slaves (Walker, Curbed New York, 4/16).

  • Washington, D.C.: The Senate Rules Committee is expected to vote on and advance a resolution proposed by Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) that would allow senators to bring children younger than one year old onto the Senate floor during votes. Duckworth recently became the first senator to give birth while in office. According to Politico, Duckworth has said that she plans to take unofficial maternity leave but will return to vote when needed or when an important vote has been scheduled (Haberkorn, Politico, 4/16).

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