Around the nation: Former first lady Barbara Bush opts for 'comfort care'

Former first lady Barbara Bush will no longer seek medical treatment for her failing health, instead opting to receive comfort care at home, according to the office of former president George H.W. Bush, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Arizona, Texas, and Washington, D.C.

  • Arizona: The Arizona Coyotes hockey team has donated $250,000 to Phoenix Children's Hospital's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. Steve Schnall, SVP and chief development officer at Phoenix Children's Hospital Foundation, said the donation will allow Phoenix Children's "to provide life-saving care to some of the sickest kids at [the hospital]" (Sunnucks, Phoenix Business Journal, 4/12).

  • Texas: Following several hospitalizations, former first lady Barbara Bush will no longer seek medical treatment for her failing health, instead opting to receive comfort care at home, according to the office of former president George H.W. Bush. According to the Washington Post, Barbara Bush is suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. According to George Bush's office, "[Barbara Bush] is surrounded by a family she adores, and appreciates the many kind messages and especially the prayers she is receiving" (Johnson, Washington Post, 4/15; ABC 13, 4/16).

  • Washington, D.C.: Washington, D.C. department of health has launched ad and social media campaigns to raise awareness about a pill called pre-exposure prophylaxis—or PrEP—which can reduce the risk of HIV infection by 92%. According to NPR, PrEP is a key part of public health officials' plan to cut the rate of new HIV infections in half by 2020 (Simmons-Duffin, NPR/Kaiser Health News, 4/13).

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