Around the nation: Facing a midair crisis, doctors didn't have a ventilator—so they built one out of an airplane oxygen mask

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

Two Florida doctors on a flight from Orlando to Jamaica saved the life of an elderly woman who was having trouble breathing by creating a makeshift respiratory device midflight, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Florida, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania.

  • Florida: Two doctors who work at North Florida Anesthesia Consultants during a flight from Orlando to Jamaica saved the life of an elderly woman who was having trouble breathing by creating a makeshift respiratory device. The doctors, Matthew Stevenson and John Flanagan, created the device midflight by using oxygen tanks and airbags found on the plane. The doctors were able to use the device to help the woman breathe for about 45 minutes until the plane could make an emergency landing in Fort Lauderdale (Gant, Fox News, 2/5; Griffith, Daily Mail, 2/4; North Florida Anesthesia Consultants employee page, accessed 2/8).

  • North Dakota: The Bush Foundation has granted the city of Minot over $200,000 to combat the opioid misuse epidemic in the city. According to Minot Mayor Chuck Barney, the money "will help us keep organizing and getting data and identifying programs that will support the community's effort in battling opioids" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 3/6).

  • Pennsylvania: Guthrie has named Joseph Sawyer Jr. as president of Robert Packer Hospital. Sawyer recently served as the interim COO of the hospital, and he has previously served as the VP of imaging systems and facility operations, as well as the VP of ancillary and support services at Guthrie (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 3/6).

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