Around the nation: Dallas dentist wins up to $1.2M to renovate historic closed hospital

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

Michelle Morgan, a dentist in Dallas, has won up to $1.2 million in funding to renovate a closed hospital that was one of the few hospitals to hire black physicians and offer health care services to black people during segregation, in today's bite-sized hospital and health industry news from Alabama, North Carolina, and Texas.

  • Alabama: St. Vincent's Health System opened up a nearly 32,000 square-foot outpatient center on Monday. The center will offer primary care in conjunction with Northside Medical Associates, as well as occupational health services and wellness services (Patchen, Birmingham Business Journal, 12/1).

  • North Carolina: To prevent a breakout of respiratory viruses in the hospital, James and Connie Maynard Children's Hospital will temporarily restrict all children ages 12 and younger from visiting patients. Officials at the hospital have said the restriction is temporary and will be lifted once the number of viral respiratory illnesses in the area decreases (Rege, Becker's Hospital Review, 12/1).

  • Texas: Michelle Morgan, a dentist in Dallas, has won up to $1.2 million in funding to renovate Forest Avenue Hospital, which was closed in 1984. According to Becker's Hospital Review's Alyssa Rege, the hospital was one of few in the Dallas area to hire black physicians and offer health care services to black people during segregation. Morgan was awarded the funding after her project won a competition hosted by The Real Estate Council, in which investors reviewed business proposals from various local candidates. Morgan won $500,000—with up to $700,000 in additional funding to cover cost overruns during construction—on the condition she tries to complete the project within 12 to 18 months (Rege, Becker's Hospital Review, 12/1).

From healthy food access to stable housing: The case for collaboration with community partners

Population health leaders know that health care delivery is incomplete without addressing the social determinants of health. But effective patient management cannot only include tasking care teams with addressing patients' social needs on top of their complex clinical needs.

Instead, providers should also partner with community-based organizations already providing quality non-clinical support for a range of needs, from healthy food access to stable housing, to scale patient management beyond traditional care settings.

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