Hospitals celebrate 'eclipse babies'

Hospitals around the country delivered babies during Monday's solar eclipse, with some taking special measures to commemorate births coinciding with the celestial event.

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At St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Missouri—a hospital located on the outer line of the path of totality, according to NASA—hospital staff dressed up the eight babies born Saturday through Monday in eclipse-themed bunting. The hospital also provided families with eclipse-themed gift baskets.

Meanwhile, Vanderbilt Children's hospital gave out eclipse-themed T-shirts to infants born over the weekend and on Monday to commemorate their birthdays coinciding with the special event.

And at Sacred Hospital in Pensacola, Florida, a woman gave birth to a girl, Charlotte Roel Easterly, "at the exact moment of the height of the eclipse," Melissa Nelson Gabriel reports for USA Today. The odds of such an occurrence, Nelson Gabriel reports, "were ... astronomical."

At Greenville Memorial Hospital, staff commemorated babies born during the day of the eclipse with a special onesie and pair of eclipse glasses. And one infant born at the hospital, just hours before the eclipse, got another keepsake: Her name, "Eclipse." The baby's mother, Freedom Eubanks, said the family originally planned to name the child "Violet," but ultimately decided that Eclipse "was just meant to be her name." Eubanks added that she was not due to deliver Eclipse until Sept. 3 (Fox 13, 8/21; Apel, WSMV, 8/21; Pelletiere, ABC News, 8/21; Nelson Gabriel, USA Today, 8/21).

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