July 14, 2017

Around the nation: Boy reunites with doctors who used first-of-its-kind procedure to save his life

Daily Briefing
    • California: A group of California residents covered by the state's Medicaid program, Medi-Cal, have filed a lawsuit claiming the program's low physician reimbursement rate creates an unequal health care system that discriminates against Latinos, who make up the majority of Medi-Cal beneficiaries.  According to Thomas Saenz—an attorney representing the plaintiffs and the president and general counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund—Medi-Cal beneficiaries have more difficulty finding doctors, experience longer wait times, have diseases diagnosed later, and wind up in the ED more often than individuals in other insurance programs. The suit seeks to require the state to reimburse physicians enough to ensure Medi-Cal enrollees receive care comparable to that received by people who have other types of insurance (Karlamangla, Los Angeles Times, 7/12).

    • New York: Kaeden Mitchell, 7, on Wednesday was reunited with the some of doctors who saved his life after he had been attacked by two dogs last month. The attack badly injured Kaeden's vertebral arteries, the main arteries that supply blood to the brain stem. To treat Kaeden, medical teams from Gates Vascular Institute and Women & Children's Hospital used a procedure that had never before been used on a child in the United States, according to Elad Levy, a neurosurgeon who treated Kaeden. The procedure involved inserting a wire thinner than human hair and then implanting an expanding stent to allow blood to flow freely, WGRZ reports (WGRZ, 7/12; Fernández, Buffalo News, 7/13).

    • Ohio: Richard Shewbridge on July 17 will take the helm as CEO of Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital, succeeding Thomas Tulisiak, who stepped down from the position to resume practicing medicine full time within the Cleveland Clinic Medicine Institute. Shewbridge has served as VP of medical operations at Medina Hospital since 2011 (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 7/12).

    Where the states stand on Medicaid expansion

    The Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed states to opt of the law's Medicaid expansion, leaving each state's decision to participate in the hands of the nation's governors and state leaders.

    The Daily Briefing editorial teams have been tracking where each state stands on the issue since the ruling, combing through lawmakers' statements, press releases, and media coverage. In this latest iteration of our Medicaid map, we've determined each state's position based on legislative or executive actions to expand coverage to low-income residents using ACA funding.

    Get the Map

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