February 13, 2017

The 10 'most promising' jobs in health care, according to LinkedIn

Daily Briefing

    LinkedIn has released a list of the "most promising" health care jobs for 2017, with pharmacy managers topping the list.

    A growing industry

    According to LinkedIn, changing technology, an aging population, and changes brought on by the Affordable Care Act have increased demand for health care professionals across every part of the industry.

    Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that almost half of the 30 fastest-growing professions in the United States are related to health care. Many of these jobs come with competitive salaries and don't require years of advanced education, according to Becker's Hospital Review.

    The 'most promising' jobs

    For its Most Promising Healthcare Jobs of 2017 report, LinkedIn looked at job openings, salary information, and member profiles to rank jobs on a 10-point scale. The scale factored in considerations including median base salaries (30 percent), job openings (20 percent), year-over-year job postings growth (15 percent), widespread regional availability (10 percent), and potential for career advancement within an organization (25 percent).

    LinkedIn found that the top 10 most promising jobs in health care for 2017 are:

    1. Pharmacy managers, with a median salary of $137,000, at least 700 job openings, and a career advancement score of 6 out of 10;
    2. Project managers, with a median salary of $86,000, at least 1,900 job openings, and a career advancement score of 8;
    3. Regulatory affairs managers, with a median salary of $115,000, at least 50 job openings, and a career advancement score of 8;
    4. Hospitalists, with a median salary of $220,000, at least 2,000 job openings, and a career advancement score of 4;
    5. Financial analysts, with a median salary of $61,500, at least 500 job openings, and a career advancement score of 10;
    6. Regional sales directors, with a median salary of $135,000, at least 70 job openings, and career advancement score of 8;
    7. Pharmacists with a median salary of $124,000, at least 2,900 job openings, and a career advancement score of 7;
    8. Product managers with a median salary of $97,900, at least 200 job openings, and a career advancement score of 10;
    9. Program managers with a median salary of $85,000, at least 700 job openings, and a career advancement score of 8;
    10. Regional directors of operations with a median salary of $117,000, at least 70 job openings, and a career advancement score of 6 (Rosin, Becker's Hospital Review, 2/7; LinkedIn report, 2/6).

    Why you're in danger of building the wrong workforce

    To succeed in the future, health care organizations will need to provide care in the lowest-cost, most appropriate setting—and to accomplish this, they’ll need a different complement of staff than in the past.

    But if today's leaders don't revise their workforce planning strategy, they're in danger of building the wrong workforce, a mistake that will be costly in the long run and could take 10 to 12 years to correct.

    Find out what you need to do to revise your approach—starting from the "outside-in."

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