Around the nation: How this library is improving community health, one patron at a time

Bite-sized hospital and health industry news

  • New York: The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has launched an initiative to help medical facilities around the globe improve their orthopedic services. Under the initiative—which is focused in Asia, the Persian Gulf, and Latin America—hospitals submit an application and a $1,000 fee to become partners, after which they send chief surgeons and other key leaders to meet with their HSS peers in New York City. The partners then pay for HSS leaders to visit their organizations to assess their core competencies and clinical care. HSS also will provide a variety of support, from medical advisory business support services to teleconferencing and professional educational platforms (Whitman, Modern Healthcare, 11/7).

  • Pennsylvania: Public health researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are training librarians at the Free Library of Philadelphia to become community health workers. In 2015, the Free Library had 5.8 million in-person visits, 500,000 of which were related to health determinants, such as literacy or job skills, stakeholders recently wrote in Health Affairs. The partnership enables the library staff to give evidence-based public health help to patrons. University of Pennsylvania's Carolyn Cannuscio said, "Being on the 'front lines,' librarians are in many ways like health care providers or social workers. ... Librarians are closely attuned to community needs" (Thielking, "Morning Rounds," STAT News, 11/10).

  • South Carolina: Gary Malaer will serve as Carolinas Hospital System's new CEO, effective Jan. 1, 2017. Malaer recently served as CEO of Wuesthoff Medical Center-Rockledge in Florida after joining the organization as COO in 2015. According to Becker's Hospital Review, Wuesthoff's patient experience and quality metrics improved under Malaer's leadership (Vaidya, Becker's Hospital Review, 11/9). 

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