February 26, 2013

CDC IDs regions with the highest cancer rates

Daily Briefing

    More than 1.5 million U.S. residents were diagnosed with invasive cancers in 2009—and a new CDC report indicates that new cases were most common in the Northeast.

    For the report, CDC researchers obtained data on invasive cancers diagnosed in 2009 from its national cancer registries. Researchers classified invasive cancers as all cancers except in situ cancers and basal or squamous cell skin cancers, according to the report.

    Overall cancer rates

    Researchers found that in 2009:

    • 459 out of every 100,000 adults were diagnosed with cancer;
    • 524 out of every 100,000 men were diagnosed;
    • 414 out of every 100,000 women were diagnosed;
    • 843 out of every 100,000 50- to 64-year-old adults were diagnosed; and
    • 2,200 out of every 100,000 patients ages 75 and up were diagnosed.

    Breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancer accounted for 52% of the cancers diagnosed in 2009, with prostate cancer as the leading cancer diagnosis for men and breast cancer as the leading cancer diagnosis for women, the study says.

    When researchers examined cancer rates by ethnicity, they found that Hispanic men were most likely to be diagnosed with colon cancer than with prostate cancer. In addition, African-American adults overall were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than Caucasian adults.

    State-by-state cancer rates

    Researchers found significant variation between state cancer rates, with rates ranging from 387 per 100,000 individuals to 509.1 per 100,000 individuals.

    Overall, they found that Northeast residents were most likely to be diagnosed with cancer, while residents of Florida, California, and the Southwest were less likely to get a cancer diagnosis.

    Meanwhile, the researchers found that:

    • Southerners were most likely to be diagnosed with lung cancer;
    • Midwesterners and Southerners were most likely to be diagnosed with colon cancer; and
    • Breast cancer diagnoses were most prevalent in the Pacific Northwest, upper Midwest, and sections of the Northeast.

    By tracking trends and monitoring changes, federal health officials are able to improve preventive health with "targeted cancer prevention and control efforts" aimed at certain populations at risk for certain cancers, the report says, especially preventable cancers (CDC report, 2/22; Farley Steele, HealthDay, 2/21).

    More from today's Daily Briefing
    1. Current ArticleCDC IDs regions with the highest cancer rates

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