Report IDs states with most, least dual eligibles

Maine, Alabama have the largest percentage of dual eligibles as a share of Medicaid

Eastern states have higher percentages of "dual eligible" patients as a share of Medicaid than Western and Midwestern states, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation report.

Altogether, about nine million U.S. residents and more than 15% of all U.S. Medicaid beneficiaries are eligible for both the Medicare and Medicaid program.

To determine the geographic distribution of these "dual eligibles," the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured and the Urban Institute analyzed Medicaid Statistical Information Statistics data from fiscal year 2008.

The report found that the 10 states with the highest percentages of dual eligibles as a share of total Medicaid enrollment were:

    1. Maine (where 26% of Medicaid beneficiaries are dual eligibles);
    2. Alabama (23%);
    3. North Dakota (22%);
    4. Kentucky (21%);
    4. New Jersey (21%);
    4. Wisconsin (21%);
    7. Florida (20%);
    7. Mississippi (20%);
    7. Rhode Island (20%); and
    7. West Virginia (20%). 

Meanwhile, the 12 states with lowest percentages of all dual eligibles as a share of total Medicaid enrollment were:

    1. Arizona (where 10% of Medicaid beneficiaries are dual eligibles);
    1. Utah (10%);
    3. Alaska (11%);
    3. California (11%);
    3. New Mexico (11%);
    6. Delaware (12%);
    6. Colorado (12%);
    8. District of Columbia (13%);
    8. Illinois (13%);
    8. Michigan (13%);
    8. Washington (13%); and
    8. Wyoming (13%).

According to the report, “these variations reflect a state’s demographic profile as well as state policy choices in Medicaid eligibility and coverage.” For example, the report notes that Eastern states generally have larger elderly populations than Western and Midwestern states.

Kaiser notes that 26 states have submitted proposals to test integrated care models for dual eligibles under a three-year, multi-state demonstration project (Kaiser report, 5/24; AHA News, 5/25).


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