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April 11, 2022

Weekly review: The 'Best Nursing Schools,' according to US News

Daily Briefing

    The "dangerous precedent" set by one nurse's conviction, how to tell if at-home Covid-19 tests are expired, and more.

    The 'Best Nursing Schools,' according to US News (Monday, April 4)

    U.S. News & World Report released its annual "Best Nursing Schools" list, with Johns Hopkins University topping the lists for both master's degrees and doctor of nursing practice degrees. Find out how the nation's top programs ranked.

    Can't fill that job? Look to familiar faces. (Tuesday, April 5)

    New data from LinkedIn's Economic Graph team found that 4.3% of all job changes in 2021 were "boomerang hires" who left a company and later returned, George Anders reports for LinkedIn. Advisory Board's Sophia Duke-Mosier and Andrew Mohama explain why (and how) you should focus on these boomerang hires.

    After one nurse's conviction for a fatal error, others warn of 'dangerous precedent' (Wednesday, April 6)

    After former nurse RaDonda Vaught last month was found guilty of two felonies following a 2017 medical error that led to the death of a patient, nurses and medical professionals across the United States voiced concern that the ruling sets a "dangerous precedent" for the criminal prosecution of medical errors.

    When do at-home Covid-19 tests expire? It's complicated. (Thursday, April 7)

    Due to "quirks" in the regulatory process for at-home Covid-19 tests, expiration dates on the tests are not always accurate. Writing for the New York Times, Tara Parker-Pope explains what to do before discarding a test that appears to be past its expiration date.

    The coronavirus is airborne. Why did WHO take 2 years to say so? (Friday, April 8)

    Until December 2021, the World Health Organization was hesitant to officially declare that SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted through the air—a slow-moving response that has drawn both support and critique from scientists and public health experts, Dyani Lewis reports for Nature.

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